Writing, Curating and Lecturing on Visual Arts, Public Space and Architecture

Analogue Case

Article on Ats Parve's exhibition at Artishok Biennale 2012.

Text exhibited during the exhibition (16.10.2012) and later published in the catalogue.


Gregor Taul x Ats Parve

 

Analogue Case

 

1

 

a) Does the human memory function as a life-long shutter that starts to mould from one end?

 

b) Will a good thought become mouldy if you keep it to yourself?

 

c) Will every time-consuming project become a great project in a cultural situation where time and movement’s fast-paced quality is adored?

 

2

 

Ats Parve exhibits time and history. Taking camera obscura to the urban space, showed people the history of photography, gathered in a box, showed something that people have been wondering about for several thousand years. Parve revived an historical time, and did something that is so often done in the theatre when staging Sophocles or Shakespeare. Loud and clear: look, there exists a supra-horizon time.

 

3

 

Camera obscura, the time-traveller, was forgotten to switch off. Instead of travelling back and forth in time, it stood and recorded today. As if the past or the present wanted to take today along somewhere.

4

What did the machine see? That everything that shines and can be shuttered is first and foremost a reflection of something extraordinary or merely an extraordinary mould? Parve is not a cynical person, he wouldn’t link the mould on the sheet to Kumu or something else from life. Mould is mould: exhibiting mould speaks of the image and the process of representation itself.

5

Mould on the white sheet also perhaps speaks for analogue photography. The moral aspect of craft.

6

And also: the sheet is an empty house or mirror onto which reflections of thousands of things appear: there is room for everyone and everything in the emptiness. The 13th century Japanese thinker Kenkó suspected: “All kinds of thoughts come floating into our minds just as they please. Isn’t that because there actually is no such thing as the mind? If we had a mind that we could control just the way we wanted, all kinds of random images could not simply invade it.”

7

a) No.

b) Yes.

c) Yes. (Resultantly: all the rest of the answers and questions at the evening’s discussion)


Previous
The Pimp of Reality
Next
The Bridges of Content and Form

Add a comment

Email again: